Steroid injection wrist recovery

A pooled quantitative literature search concerning the treatment of de Quervain’s tenosynovitis compared 7 studies (a total of 459 wrists) with identical diagnostic and success criteria. 4 Average follow-up was months (range, 1 week to 7 years). There were no control groups in the studies, and none of the studies were randomized. Of the 226 cases treated with steroid injection alone, 83% were cured, though 30 of these needed a second injection. Sixty-one percent of those treated with injection and splint were cured, while 14% treated with splint alone reported cure.

Twenty-five patients in the local steroid group and 25 patients in the wrist splinting group completed the study procedures. At 4 weeks after treatment, there was significant improvement of the BTCQ scores in both the steroid group and splinting group. There was improvement of the finger dexterity test only in the steroid group but not in the splinting group. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the changes of BTCQ scores between the two groups after treatment. Patient satisfaction score was higher in the steroid group. Patients in the steroid group took fewer painkillers after treatment. Four patients developed side effects after splinting and three after local steroid injection, which was not statistically significant.

The patient should remain in the supine position for several minutes after the injection. To ascertain whether the pharmaceuticals have been injected into the appropriate location, move the joint through passive range of motion. For tenosynovitis, stress the finger flexors to ascertain the same. A compression dressing should be applied after aspirating a ganglion cyst. To monitor for any adverse reactions, the patient should remain in the office for 30 minutes after the injection. In general, patients should avoid strenuous activity involving the injected region for 48 hours. Patients should be cautioned that they may experience worsening symptoms during the first 24 to 48 hours related to a possible steroid flare, which can be treated with ice and NSAIDs. A follow-up appointment should be arranged within three weeks.

Radiculopathy occurs when something irritates a spinal nerve—say a “slipped disc” causing a pinched nerve. This is also called sciatica . There are resident stem and other cells in the local tissues everywhere in our body. Many live around blood vessels. These are obviously also present in the disc and nerves in the epidural space and they usually play an important role in suppressing inflammation and repairing damage. We know, based on a copious in vitro (lab) data, that the high-dose steroids used in epidural injections can kill these cells. So the progression of the series of epidural steroid injections looks a little something like this:

Steroid injection wrist recovery

steroid injection wrist recovery

Radiculopathy occurs when something irritates a spinal nerve—say a “slipped disc” causing a pinched nerve. This is also called sciatica . There are resident stem and other cells in the local tissues everywhere in our body. Many live around blood vessels. These are obviously also present in the disc and nerves in the epidural space and they usually play an important role in suppressing inflammation and repairing damage. We know, based on a copious in vitro (lab) data, that the high-dose steroids used in epidural injections can kill these cells. So the progression of the series of epidural steroid injections looks a little something like this:

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