Intralesional steroid keloid

Dosage for Kenalog 10 Injection is individualized based on the condition and patient response. Kenalog 10 Injection may interact with aminoglutethimide, birth control pills, hormone replacement therapy, blood thinners, cyclosporine, digoxin, insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth, isoniazid, rifampin, seizure medication, antibiotics, aspirin, or other NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Tell your doctor all medications you are taking. Kenalog 10 Injection should be used during pregnancy only if prescribed. This medication may be harmful to a fetus. Infants born to mothers who have received corticosteroids during pregnancy should be observed for signs of hypoadrenalism. This medication can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

There are many different treatment options for various types of scars so the cost would depend on the type of scar, location, how large the scar is, and what treatments would be necessary.  Keloidal or hypertrophic (raised) scars are treated with intralesional injections with steroids or chemotherapy agents such as 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) or bleomycin, and also with certain lasers.  Other scars may benefit from resurfacing lasers such as CO2, Erbium, Fractionated CO2, or Fraxel treatments.  The overall price can range from $75 for one steroid injection to several thousand dollars if several lasers are used and if multiple treatments with multiple devices are required for large exstensive areas.  It is necessary to have a consultation with a knowledgeable board-certified dermatologist who specializes in treatment of scars.

Meshkinpour et al (2005) examined the safety and effectiveness of the ThermaCool TC radiofrequency system for treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars and assessed treatment associated collagen changes.  Six subjects with hypertrophic and 4 with keloid scars were treated with the ThermaCool device: 1/3 of the scar received no treatment (control), 1/3 received one treatment and 1/3 received 2 treatments (4-week interval).  Scars were graded before and then 12 and 24 weeks after treatment on symptoms, pigmentation, vascularity, pliability, and height.  Biopsies were taken from 4 subjects with hypertrophic scars and evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) staining, multi-photon microscopy, and pro-collagen I and III immunohistochemistry.  No adverse treatment effects occurred.  Clinical and H & E evaluation revealed no significant differences between control and treatment sites.  Differences in collagen morphology were detected in some subjects.  Increased collagen production (type III > type I) was observed, appeared to peak between 6 and 10 weeks post-treatment and had not returned to baseline even after 12 weeks.  The authors concluded that use of the thermage radiofrequency device on hypertrophic scars resulted in collagen fibril morphology and production changes.  ThermaCool alone did not achieve clinical hypertrophic scar or keloid improvement.  They noted that the collagen effects of this device should be studied further to optimize its therapeutic potential for all indications.

The medical information provided in this site is for educational purposes only and is the property of the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice and shall not create a physician - patient relationship. If you have a specific question or concern about a skin lesion or disease, please consult a dermatologist. Any use, re-creation, dissemination, forwarding or copying of this information is strictly prohibited unless expressed written permission is given by the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.

Intralesional steroid keloid

intralesional steroid keloid

The medical information provided in this site is for educational purposes only and is the property of the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice and shall not create a physician - patient relationship. If you have a specific question or concern about a skin lesion or disease, please consult a dermatologist. Any use, re-creation, dissemination, forwarding or copying of this information is strictly prohibited unless expressed written permission is given by the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.

Media:

intralesional steroid keloidintralesional steroid keloidintralesional steroid keloidintralesional steroid keloidintralesional steroid keloid

http://buy-steroids.org