Corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses definition

Glucocorticoid side-effects include diabetes and osteoporosis ( section ), which is a danger, particularly in the elderly, as it can result in osteoporotic fractures for example of the hip or vertebrae (see NICE CKS Osteoporosis - prevention of fragility fractures for recommendations ); in addition high doses are associated with avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Muscle wasting (proximal myopathy) can also occur. Corticosteroid therapy is also weakly linked with peptic ulceration and perforation; and this risk is increased with concomitant NSAID (including low dose aspirin) use. There is no conclusive evidence that the use of enteric-coated preparations of prednisolone reduces the risk of peptic ulceration. Patients are also at risk of Psychiatric Reactions, see the BNF.

2 years and older:
Cream/ointment: Apply a thin layer to the affected area once a day

12 years and older:
Lotion: Apply a thin layer to the affected area once a day

Comments:
-Safety and efficacy in pediatric patients for more than 3 weeks of use have not been established.
-This topical drug should not be applied in the diaper area if the child still requires diapers or plastic pants.
-Therapy should be discontinued when control is obtained.
-If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, reassessment of diagnosis may be needed.

Use: Relief of the inflammatory and pruritic manifestations of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses

Corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses definition

corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses definition

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